Photo by Gia To

BECKONING
BLUE HOUR
a double bill

Aa

BECKONING

A perfect melding of Taiwanese culture and Western contemporary dance, each equally balanced against the other.
Taipei Times

“People can often turn into another identity in one instant. And I am fascinated by how these changes take place on their bodies, expressions and tones,” said CHENG Tsung-lung. Distilling movements subtly from Taiwanese street-dancing ritual of Ba Jia Jiang, the ‘Eight Infernal Generals,’ CHENG has created a mysterious zigzag of body language that gives this abstract work a playful yet poetic quality.

Choreography

CHENG Tsung-lung

Music

CHUNG Cheng-da
Quiet Quartet

Premiere

2015

Photo by LIU Chen-hsiang

BLUE HOUR

Blue Hour breaks away from the restrictions of any known dance vocabulary and provides a new way of expression for private emotions.
Artalks

Blue hour, translated from the French term “l'heure bleue,” refers to the fuzzy moment when day and night are alternating and obscuring one another. Drawing his inspiration from the hazy blue sky seen one morning in a predawn darkness during his visit in New York, CHENG Tsung-lung seeks to present intangible minds with conscious bodies in Blue Hour.

Six female dancers, clad in elegant long black skirts, make intermittent and broken movements by oneself as if they are making their own individual silent monologues. These bizarre movements, setting against the sound of rhythmic footstep from the group dance and the lines that segmented the space by long skirts, create an aesthetic sense of melancholy and agitation. Later, immersing in the persistent and continuous solace music of cello and string orchestra by John Tavener’s Protecting Veil, dancers become restless and frantic, and yet, reveal traces of tranquility.

Choreography

CHENG Tsung-lung

Music

John Tavener

Premiere

2013

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